The Peanut Butter Falcon

audience Reviews

96% Audience Score96%
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    Peanut Butter Falcon is a timely portrayal of the issue of self determination for today's individuals with disabilities. With the close of state run institutions and the long wait for housing for the disabled, there is a need for new approaches to meet their needs for care. Thinking outside the box is producing new ideas for tailoring a lifestyle that suits each individual. What is a perfect solution for one person may be totally inappropriate for another. Zack was fortunate to be able to forge a fulfilling life with two very unlikely people who seem to need him as much as he needs them. A perfect solution!
  • 3 of 5 stars
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    How many Suns would a Sundance dance if a Sundance could dance Suns? The answer is THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON. This movie looked a little too precious for its own good, and thankfully it's rough enough around the edges to justify its existence - but not much more. This indie darling almost won me over if not for several key factors. Namely, Shia Labeouf and Dakota Johnson are both on a short list of my least favorite actors. It's not that they're bad actors, it's just that I hate their stupid faces and can't stand when they talk. Also, the scenario is totally contrived and the logistics of the plot are implausible, but hey it's a movie so that last part can be forgiven. Zak (Zack Gottsagen) is a young man with Downs who has been resigned to a nursing home due to a plot-facilitating state oversight. He wants to be a professional wrestler, and he manages to escape the old folks' home to begin his Huckleberry Finn-esque journey of finding a wrestling school. On the way he bumps into Lebeowulf, a southern drawling, crab trawling bumpkin with a chip on his shoulder who just so happens to be primed for an unlikely, reluctant friendship that will hopefully replace his dead brother. Johnson plays the unlikely, reluctant city-girl love interest - with a heart of gold - on the search for Zak because her boss told her to after refusing to responsibly report the problem to the proper authorities. And wouldn't you know it - Zak becomes a plucky sidekick to Laybeef as they traverse the southeast coast sandbars in dilapidated dirigibles, affirming each others' sense of self and getting into corn-fried hijinks. Watch out for the white trash fishers who are out to get Labohemf! You can immediately tell it's equal parts SWISS ARMY MAN, AMERICAN HONEY, and O BROTHER, WHERE ART THOU?, just with the scary, podunk timbre of VERNON, FLORIDA. Then there's the fact that Gottsagen actually has Downs. I dunno; despite there being good intentions with the screenwriters making the role specifically for Gottsagen, I couldn't help but feel like it was forced and exploitative. It's really difficult to put aside the fact that he's only wearing underwear for nearly the first thirty minutes of the film. Is it supposed to be funny? Is it supposed to endear? Is it a "brave, bold debut" for a budding star (who happens to have Downs)? No, the thing is directly focused on his disability and how he is supposed to break the mold with it, despite the fact that he is constantly displayed in grotesque and unsanitary set pieces. He slathers himself half-naked in soap to squeeze through barred windows. He vomits all over himself while being introduced to his companion. He gets drunk and gets smeared in peanut butter for the titular payload. He is beaten and called the R word by an old hick in a wrestling match. And it's either played for laughs or for pathos. Like I said, it just feels exploitative despite the eventual magical realism, despite the "family is the friends you make" woodsy, feel-good junk. Perhaps what is supposed to be commendable is that a disabled person is playing a role with that disability, but there are WAAAAAY more dignified roles for such folks (see: Todd Solondz' WIENER-DOG or Lars von Triers "The Kingdom" miniseries) that aren't played for laughs despite standard genre conventions. Anyway, thinking about THE PEANUT BUTTER FALCON got me more worked up than watching it. It has the heartfelt moments that give you what you expect on a Sunday afternoon, but I don't think it is designed to be ruminated on. It would have worked much better as a family friendly version minus the f-bombs, but then it wouldn't be edgy enough for whatever hipster was working distribution after TIFF, trying to entice their friends at Buzzfeed to push blurbs about this "revelation of a film" on their unread blogs.
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    One of the best goofy/feel good movies I've seen in awhile. Its quirky, its original and it has tons of character. My only knock on the movie is the ending. I was hoping for a little more, but still really enjoyed it. Was definitely one of the best films of 2019 and will warm the heart!
  • 3.5 of 5 stars
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    This is an excellent film. Good story.
  • 3 of 5 stars
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    "Peanut Butter Falcon" é, em virtude do baixo orçamento, um filme simples. No entanto, essa simplicidade não estraga a qualidade do longa-metragem, muito pelo contrário: ela a erige e, por conseguinte, transforma a obra cinematográfica em algo prazeroso de se assistir. O personagem-título é Zak, um jovem com Síndrome de Down que deseja ser um lutador de luta-livre. Ele passa a maior parte de seus dias reassistindo fitas VHS de seu ídolo, o lutador profissional Salt Water Redneck e elaborando planos para escapar da clínica na qual foi colocado pelo Estado. Quando consegue sair, cruza com o azarado malfeitor Tyler, e os dois seguem para a escola de Salt Water, onde Zack poderá ir em busca de seu sonho. Com atuações aceitáveis (alguns atores estão muito bem, outros nem tanto), uma boa direção e um roteiro que apresenta boas premissas, o filme oferece uma boa dose de ação, misturada com outra de comicidade, fato que não deixa seu ritmo cair e ficar sem graça enquanto o arco de seus personagens principais é desenvolvido. Sem dúvidas, a maior façanha dos diretores e roteiristas é como constroem amizade de Zak e Tyler de forma tão natural, com suas similaridades – que aparecem gradualmente ao longo da viagem: os dois são fugitivos e sentem falta de uma estrutura familiar que lhes apoie - e discrepâncias: enquanto Tyler é mais calmo e quieto, Zak, por sua vez, é, de certo modo, imperativo e petulantemente inquieto. O conjunto de similaridades e discrepâncias entre os personagens lhes transformam em um grande instrumento cômico. Em sua ambientação, existe uma liberdade na paisagem verde que reflete a liberdade buscada pelos protagonistas. Para eles, a vida na cidade, apesar de segura, parece restritiva – e por isso que fogem dela. Esse conflito é encarnado em Eleanor (Dakota Johnson), uma das funcionárias da clínica. Ela recebe como tarefa trazer Zak de volta. Quando encontra a dupla, ela se põe diante de uma difícil questão: as pessoas deveriam prezar pela sobrevivência ou, realmente, viver? Além da paisagem verde, pode-se acompanhar os personagens seguindo o fluxo da água, que, neste caso, simboliza a busca por um recomeço e o anseio pela realização de um sonho "utópico". Com uma boa trilha sonora e um elenco, em geral, interessante, "The Peanut Butter Falcon" tira o máximo de sua premissa e funciona como um lembrete de esperança em meio à adversidade. Palavra definitória: Bom.
  • 3 of 5 stars
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    An unlikely duo. So this is about a kid with Down syndrome (Zack Gottsagen). He has nobody to take care of him and nowhere to go, so he got stuck in a retirement home. He has dreams of being a wrestling star, so he breaks out of his living arrangement and becomes a stowaway on a boat captained by a troubled young man (Shia LaBeouf). He's in the process of skipping town after burning some bridges, so why not drop the kid off at wrestling school along the way? Now I missed this one in theaters, but it still stayed on my radar, as it was beloved by both audiences and critics alike. I like that Shia is working on projects like this and Honey Boy, and I really think that he has made a turn in his career. Also, much like Honey Boy, I feel that I like this better in concept than the actual overall execution. Now, this is by no means a bad movie, and I understand how this has gathered the following it is currently bolstering. I really love the fact that they got somebody with Down syndrome and made him the star of a movie; people with this condition aren't afforded the same opportunities as everybody else, so good on the makers of this for putting together a movie with a part like this. Of course, this does mean that it sometimes gets a bit mumbly and hard to understand at times, but it doesn't detract all that much. I was really with this movie for about the first half, and it has everything to do with the chemistry between Gottsagen and LaBeouf. It is genuinely funny to watch LaBeouf become annoyed with his mannerisms as they are trying to put some miles behind them, and it is sweet to see him grow to care for the kid and treat him like a normal person. So what's not to like? The longer this story goes on, the more predictable it becomes. The charm never goes away, but most of the surprises do, so I did reach a point where I did check out, which is never a good sign when your movie is only about 90 minutes long. The ending also becomes pure fantasy which doesn't tonally fit with the rest of the film which stays reasonably grounded, and I feel like it is unintentionally hilarious. If this does sound like your thing, then, by all means, check it out, I hope you like it. For me, this just ended up being somewhere in the middle of the road.
  • 4.5 of 5 stars
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    Shia LaBeouf once again proves what a formidable actor he is with this incredibly well written, directed, shot, and acted movie. Probably the best independent film of the year. 9/10
  • 3 of 5 stars
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    Trying hard to be a feel good movie but a better script would have helped. Labeouf was a standout.
  • 5 of 5 stars
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    Amazing from start to finish. Loved it.
  • 4 of 5 stars
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    A Great Feel good movie. The friendship of Tyler and Zack really make you want to join them in their adventure.